Friday, 7 October 2016

Passing the Post Box


This man holding a large cauliflower always makes me smile.  I like to think he is returning home from his Allotment with this freshly dug prize specimen tucked under his arm for dinner.  The post box where he is posting his letter is another prize specimen for this is the hexagonal 'Penfold' (named after its designer) and some post box enthusiasts will travel the country for a sight and picture of one of these ornate pillar boxes.  The first one was installed in 1866 and they continued to be manufactured, with small design variations, for another thirteen years.  Their continuing popularity with people meant that around 1988/1990 Royal Mail introduced a replica made of cast iron from a mold of the original Penfold and installed them in places of historic interest; so as not to confuse the original with the replicas these have a plate on the base indicating its more modern date.  There is no indication on the postcard of where the box is or was but the year the photograph was taken is stated, 1949.

More 'Postcards for the Weekend' on the theme - Post/Mail Related Items at Connections to the World

9 comments:

DawnTreader said...

That's a great picture - love it! :)

Helen said...

I love the picture too. Black and White postcards are timeless.

Such a cool picture. Thanks for posting it.

John Edwards said...

I have sent that to a few people but I think I've run out now.

caijsa said...

I like black and white old photos of people - they always tell interesting stories.

Eva A. said...

Yes, I received this one form John. It's a great picture, it also makes me smile.

Gerda Theunis said...

Great view of the past and interesting story!

John's Island said...

Hi Joy, Enjoyed the photo and your write up. I'm curious ... in the collection box in your header, what goes into the slot on the right where the label has been scratched off? Out of the country? Thanks for your kind comments on my blog.

Maria said...

Another word for my vocabulary: penfold. Thanks so much for sharing this very interesting card and write up, Joy! It's nice that back then there's not much use of plastics to carry produce.

Joy said...

The header is a London post box John which are large boxes for lots of mail, the slot on the right is for franked mail which will be used by business in the area.