Sunday, 26 January 2014

Rocky

New Zealand celebrated its scientists conducting Antarctic Research in 1984 with a set of 4 stamps of which I have these two. I imagine the 14 million square kilometres of ice and snow provide a lot of research opportunities. New Zealand set up their first base in Antarctica (Scott Base) in 1957 on the southernmost tip of Ross Island on the Ross Ice Shelf, which continues to be occupied with other bases later established elsewhere.   The Geology Research stamp stamp shows Shapeless Mountain which portrays the  "study programmes of the Beacon supergroup rock formation of Shapeless Mountain and Mount Fleming at the head of the Wright Valley,- in the Dry Valley's region of Antarctica".  The other stamp shows the studies on Ross Island of the Seal Colonies.  That seal has probably gone to sleep under the hood.

The set was designed by the artist RM (Robert Maurice) Conly (1920-1995) who designed many stamps and coins for New Zealand.  Perhaps I should call him Wing Commander Conly for he was also the official artist for the Royal New Zealand Air Force.  He must have been the 'go to' person for this set for he had spent time in the Antarctic and returned there n 1974 as part 'Artists in Antarctica' scheme.
Travelling to the other end of the globe and the Faroe Islands these stamps show the effects of continental drift/plate tectonics. On the left, 60 million years ago and on the right, 15 million years ago. Before the stamps travelled in the post from the Faroes to England they were part of a miniature sheet issued in 2009 called "The Origin of the Faroes"  The islands have been described as "giant slices of tiered basalt".  Here are the cliffs  rising from the sea:
 The tectonics slowly moved the Faroes away from the active volcanic regions and lava flow where Iceland still lives
The islands are considered an unspoilt environment perfect for active holidays of hikes and trips.  The stamp shows Trøllanes, the northernmost point of the Island of Kalsoy and an important bird area.  The village of the same name consists of 23 people. The name Trøllanes means "Forland of Trolls" and one of the legends say that the trolls visit it on 12th night (6 January) every year.  The stamps, as can be seen, were issued as the Faroes contribution to the Europa 2012 tourist theme "Visit".

   

11 comments:

Hawwa said...

It's the same for me: if I think "geology" I think of Iceland and Australia. Your stamps are truly amazing. Thanks for posting them and the information.

Hawwa said...

Ooops! I meant "New Zealand"!!

Bob Scotney said...

Magnificent geological stamps. The tectonic plate stamps are a great idea; the last two stamps are spectacular.

Sheila @ A Postcard a Day said...

The stamps from the Faroes are stunning! I did think of Antarctica but I suspect I've covered that before, not that that necessarily stops me.

Lisa B said...

Great selection of stamps, I haven't seen stamps from the Faroe Islands before.

agi said...

really great selection, i have been desiring the panoramic faroe islands stamps ever since i've seen them first..!

viridian said...

This is the first time I have seen any of these stamps, now I am love with them all! Love the plate tectonic stamps!
Thank you so much for sharing these.

luvlinens said...

All nice stamps but I really like the panoramic stamps the most.

VioletSky said...

I have no Faroe or Antarctic stamps - must remember to look for some at the next stamp market!

The Antarctic stamp with the seals looks like the researcher is reading to use it as a sled!

Heleen said...

The landscapes are beautiful! Although I'm starting to feel the cold :-)

Above all I love the 'Antarctic geology research' stamp! Stamps showing scientific research are very rare, I think, so it's nice nice to see. Thank you for sharing!

(The biology research is also about science, it's probably useful research, but it's not my favourite because I feel pity for the captured blindfolded seal...)

♥ Willa ♥ said...

Great choices for today's theme.Thanks for sharing it with us.

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